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Jesus with the Political Leader - Roman Governor, Pilate
Home > Words Directly From the Historical Jesus > Interactions with Specific People > Jesus with the Political Leader - Roman Governor, Pilate
 
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17 entries for this category:

JESUS WAS IN WORLD FOR RELIGIUS REASON NOT POLITICAL ISSUES,THAT IS WHY POLICAL LEADER DONT FIND ANY MISTAKES TO HIM



By: COOL JAY
Category: The Political Leader - Roman Governor, Pilate
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JESUS WITH THE POLITICAL LEADERS
Jesus new already that they would not except Him and that was a one of His trials that He had to go though.  If they had believe who He really we  would not be here this day because of their blindness we were saved.  He knew that His only true help was in His Father who had sent Him.


URL: http://jesuscentral.com

By: vanessa smith
Category: Jesus with the Political Leader - Roman Governor, Pilate
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Jesus was born & Jesus came into the world because...
he came to give evidence `in the court of life` of persons and things that are absolute truth in both the earth and heaven. ''John 18''



By: Chris Peacock
Category: Jesus with the Political Leader - Roman Governor, Pilate
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Governor Pilate Pathetic in my eyes

Roman governors had enormous power as representatives of Rome. They enforced Roman interests and defended the hierarchical social order. They exercised military, political, social, judicial, and economic control, often in exploitative and harsh ways, for the benefit of the elite.

Pilate’s enormous "life and death" power should shape how we read the gospel narratives of Jesus’ crucifixion. Pilate is not a neutral or weak or minor character. He is not forced to crucify Jesus by the Jerusalem leaders against his will. He crucifies Jesus because it is in Rome’s interests to do so, interests he is charged with protecting and furthering.

Crucifixion

Jesus dies by a distinctly Roman form of execution. Rome did not usually delegate the right to impose the death penalty to provincial leaders. It was Pilate’s decision.

Crucifixion was reserved for low-status defendants, not for Roman citizens and members of the elite. It made an example of those who threatened the Roman social order: runaway slaves, those who attacked the property of the powerful rich, those who committed treason by claiming power and rule not authorized by Rome. Jesus’ crucifixion indicates that he is perceived by the ruling elite to pose a threat to the status quo.

Jesus proclaimed the "empire of God." The noun translated as "kingdom" or "reign" is used in other writings to refer to various empires including Rome’s. His announcement threatens Rome’s empire with a rival way of restructuring the world. He is understood to claim to be "king of the Jews," a title that only Rome could award to safe and loyal elite allies. Rome killed others who claimed such a role without Rome’s blessing. He attacks the Jerusalem temple, the center of power for the Jerusalem leaders, Rome’s allies, and a key institution in maintaining the vast inequalities of wealth and power. Jesus does not die as a poor, innocent, person mistreated by a weak Pilate. He dies as a subversive threat to Rome’s system. Pilate decides to put him to death for Rome’s sake.5

Alliances

Pilate and the Jerusalem leaders are allies. Making alliances with local leaders was a common strategy Rome used to rule its empire. Along with taxes and military power, alliances with provincial elites were an effective way of establishing control. Mutual interests of wealth, power, and status held these aristocratic alliances together under Roman control.

The Roman governor appointed the high priests in Judea. The chief priest Caiaphas was a political appointment who held power at the pleasure of his Roman masters. Of course, there were tensions and struggles within these alliances. But together, the Roman governor and the local Jerusalem leaders sought to maintain Rome’s imperial system in which about three percent of the population ruled for their own benefit at the expense of the rest.6

Maintaining this alliance required good political skills. If the Jerusalem leaders view Jesus as a threat to their power, Pilate knows to take their concern very seriously. Their interests are Pilate’s interests.

But there are other political games to play. On one hand, Pilate needs to keep them happy by granting their request to remove Jesus. In Matthew and Mark, he and the Jerusalem leaders cooperate in manipulating the crowd into calling for Jesus’ death, thereby expressing and accomplishing the elite’s will. Pilate can execute a kingly claimant as the people’s will without fearing unrest and reprisals. On the other hand, he needs to show the provincial leaders that as the Roman governor he is their superior and that they are dependent on him. John’s account especially highlights this dimension where Pilate seems to taunt them about their dependent status and skillfully solicits from them an amazing declaration of loyalty to the emperor (John 19:15). In Luke’s account, he makes them beg him to execute Jesus while ensuring that no rift develops in the alliance.

Roman "Justice"?

Roman justice often operated on the basis that the punishment would fit the person. A bias toward the elite and against low status people existed in the administration of Roman "justice."7 As governor, Pilate administers justice to protect the elite’s interests against a low status, provincial peasant/artisan like Jesus.

A scene in Matthew, for example, provides commentary on this legal bias. When Jesus is handed over to Pilate in 27:1-2, the narrative switches to Judas. Verse 3 of chapter 27 begins, "When Judas his betrayer saw that he (Jesus) was condemned…". The choice of verb is telling. There has been no "trial" yet, no announcement of condemnation. But Judas concludes from the handing over of Jesus to Pilate that Jesus is as good as dead. Like any low status person, Judas knows that the system will make sure of it.

The biggest challenge for Pilate in crucifying Jesus comes from the risk of unrest from Jesus’ supporters. In executing a "wannabe" king, Pilate runs the risk of provoking social unrest and dreams of freedom, especially at Passover. In several gospel accounts, Pilate questions the crowds about what to do with Jesus. He does so not because he is unsure about Jesus the king or unwilling to put him to death. Rather, he is testing levels of support for Jesus. He polls the crowd. He questions the crowd to find out how extensive and how solid is their support for Jesus.

Manipulated by the Jerusalem leaders at work among the crowd and intimidated by Pilate’s power, the crowd expresses support for Pilate’s action. The gospel narratives show Pilate to be an astute governor in administering Roman justice.

Pilate, then, has a central role in the crucifixion of Jesus. Jesus’ death comes about in ways typical of Roman imperial control. An astute and powerful Roman governor, Pilate works with his allies, the Jerusalem leaders, to remove a threat to their power and to their vision of society.




By: Mary Jones
Category: Jesus with the Political Leader - Roman Governor, Pilate
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Jesus perhaps understood the Latin which Pilate Political Leader used.



By: Takao Ogawa
Category: Jesus with the Political Leader - Roman Governor, Pilate
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Jesus went to Jerusalem for the sake of the Encounter with Pilate.



By: Takao Ogawa
Category: Jesus with the Political Leader - Roman Governor, Pilate
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`What is truth?` of Pilate`s quesitin means,
`What is truth? `means `What is eternal Life?`



By: Takao Ogawa
Category: Jesus with the Political Leader - Roman Governor, Pilate
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Jesus with the Political Leader-Roman Governor,Pilate
interchanged about the king of the Jews.



By: Takao Ogawa
Category: Jesus with the Political Leader - Roman Governor, Pilate
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Pilate did not know really who Jesus was.
It is not clear what Pilate understood about the kingship of Jesus (John 18:33,18:36,18:37),but certainly Pilate speaks of Jesus as king of Jews(John 19:14,19:15,19:19,19:21-22).Pilate seems to have sensed much more than he actually understood.What does it mean to say that Jesus is the King of the Jews ? Jesus not only wants to be the king of the Jews,but the King of every nation,and city,and family.And that begins for you when you submit to him as your King.



By: Takao Ogawa
Category: Jesus with the Political Leader - Roman Governor, Pilate
(1) Comments
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King = .....
authority over a people & singular not plural & most important ''from dictionary.com definitions''



By: Chris Peacock
Category: Jesus with the Political Leader - Roman Governor, Pilate
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Pilate entered the praetorium again and called Jesus, and said to him, "Are you the King of the Jews?" Jesus answered, "Do you say this of your own accord, or did others say it to you about me?" Pilate answered, "Am I a Jew? Your own nation and the chief priests have handed you over to me; what have you done?" Jesus answered, "My kingship is not of this world; if my kingship were of this world, my servants would fight, that I might not be handed over to the Jews; but my kingship is not from the world." Pilate said to him, "So you are a king?" Jesus answered, "You say that I am a king. For this I was born, and for this I have come into the world, to bear witness to the truth. Every one who is of the truth hears my voice." Pilate said to him, "What is truth?" After he had said this, he went out to the Jews again, and told them, "I find no crime in him. But you have a custom that I should release one man for you at the Passover; will you have me release for you the King of the Jews?" They cried out again, "Not this man, but Barab'bas!" Now Barab'bas was a robber. ( John 18:33-40)

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